• West Coast Music

    As the name indicates West Coast Music has its origin on the American West Coast. The music emphasizes melody, harmonies and arrangements, and the vocal and instrumental performances are always with great skill and of high quality. The music is often performed by pop/rock artists from the American West Coast, but is in no way limited to any geografical area.

rb

The keyboard player from Maxus…

A little bit about me:

I grew up in Vancouver, BC Canada and started playing the piano (classical) when I was 5 (or 6 according to Mom). I had the best teacher (Ed Parker) life could give and did very well with him. I would win quite a few local competitions and the odd bigger one. It was a great period of learning and Mr. Parker (I still can’t bring myself to call him Ed even though we were very close when I was a kid) taught me to, besides actual playing, appreciate the gift I was given. It was rarely a drag to play piano.

When I was 12, I got a gig in Dawson City, Yukon Territory (Canada), playing 6 nights a week and lasted for most of the summer vacation. It was my very first paying job (50 bucks a week), but, for that time (early 60’s), it was a ton a’ dough. Never having had money before that made this seem like the lottery. Anyway, the gig was playing piano for a summer theatre play and an 1890’s variety show on a big paddle boat, alternating each night. It was an experience that changed my life forever. I had made friends with some of the local natives (Canadian Indians), one in particular, Jimmy Drugan, who was pretty crazy but alot of fun. He taught me all about coffee, cigarettes, alcohol and guns.

So being on my own at 12, earning my own income, eating in restaurants and paying my own cheque, the coffee, the cigarettes, the alcohol – it was all very “grown-up”. There was no going back (to being a kid) after all that. From there on, outside of my friends, school sucked. I would be in trouble at school most of the time (skipping out, etc). I stopped playing classical music completely around the age of 13. My Mom had a real difficult time with me for a couple of those early teenage years, but eventually a friend and fellow piano player (the late and great Tom Baird) talked me into buying an organ and getting into a band. I took his advice and was soon playing in a solid working band (Soul Unlimited) and working most weekends, doing R&B dance halls and school grads, aftergrads, etc.

Since I was only playing organ and clavinet, my piano wasn’t improving, so at 19 or 20, I went back to Mr. Parker to get serious about music. He really got me going this time, because now I was an adult and had a much better focus on the importance of what I was learning, besides the fact that I was now practicing 6-8 hours a day! I did very well with my classical studies and began to study jazz with Lloyd Abrams – another teaching giant. I lasted another 3 years in Vancouver, playing in alot of clubs and bands, doing all kinds of music, but mostly R&B, rockn’roll and jazz. My chops were way up because of my return to Mr. Parker and classical piano.

Eventually, a good friend (Carl Graves) with whom I had played for many years in Vancouver bands (with my great friend bassist and drummer Peter Padden), that had moved to LA to sing with Skylark (David Foster’s band), called me to come to LA to write with him. He had a record deal and so I went down and wrote a bunch of songs with him and started getting into arranging and playing in studios (as opposed to live). Because of my classical theory/harmony training and the jazz theory, it all came pretty easy and seemed like alot of fun.

In 1978, I auditioned for a movie called “The Rose” and got the part of the keyboard player in the band. It was another awesome experience. Getting to work with Bette (Midler), doing a world tour with her, and doing the movie itself. The Rose band was very cool – Danny Weiss (outrageous)on guitar, Mark Leonard on bass, Whitey Glan on drums, Steve Hunter on guitar, Jerry Jummonville on sax, Norton Buffalo on harp, sorry, I can’t remember the other horn players but they were great too. The live band on the tour was also great. We had Doane Perry (now with Jethro Tull) on drums, Alan Mansfield on B3, etc.

In 1980, we formed the Maxus band with Jay Gruska, Mark Leonard, Doane Perry and finally, after several different guitar players, Mike Landau. I loved playing with the band but, because my personal career was doing so well as a session player, I didn’t want to end up having a hit and playing it on the road for the next ten years, so, I left. Jay, too, had many other things “on the fire.” Still, it was a blast playing with guys that played that well every day on our own songs. Studio guys are that way too, but you’re usually playing someone elses songs. Depending on the session, that can be good or bad.

From there on, I don’t have much to tell you because it’s all kind of listed in my discography. I would like to tell you that I have a beautiful daughter Aubrey (age 12), and my soulmate of soulmates girlfriend Betty. I spend about 9 months a year in LA and the other 3 months in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, with a studio in both residences.

Words and picture from the official website.

Discography

Original Demos

Cool Sound Records 2000

Tracks: Love Always Finds A Reason, Somebody In Your Life, Heart Don´t Change Your Mind, Close Enough, Any Other Fool, Deeper Side Of Love, Send Me Someone, I Will Be The Last One, Someone To Watch Over Me, Bliss, Only Love & Rivals.

Musicians on the Original Demos album: Robbie Buchanan, Dennis Herring, Dann Huff, Michael Thompson, Tim Pierce and others.

Maxus

Warner Bros 1981

Tracks: The Higher You Rise, Nobody´s Business, What You Give, Keep A Light On, Your Imagination, They Danced, Part Of You, Don´t Try To Stop Me Now & Where Were You.

Musicians on the Maxus album: Jay Gruska, Michael Landau, Robbie Buchanan, Mark Leonard, Doane Perry, Paulinho Da Costa, Michael Omartian, Jennifer Williams, Tommy Funderburk & Bill Champlin.

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